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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
air strikes. and it has been a problem since this administration helped create the environment in north africa. and in the middle east, with those who want to see israel destroyed could take power. more violence has occurred. not less. more people's lives are in danger, not less. there's less freedom of worship, not more. the things that we believe in, freedom of worship of all people, or no worship if people choose not to worship, those kind of things should be kept. and yet, we are seeing this administration took over afghanistan, more americans die and about half the time under commander-in-chief obama has died in seven years than president bush. american military. over 70% of those killed in afghanistan have been under commander obama and about half the time. we have seen violence escalating against americans in afghanistan. we have seen the last christian church, public christian church pull out of afghanistan. this administration should be encouraging freedom of worship, encouraging the liberation of women, of children. and yet, for all its help, it has created environmen
with training, and you have to create an environment where you understand that is going to happen and it is not necessarily a career injured. we are working on it. it is absolutely essential that we do. when i came in, we notice that 70's are of our public diplomacy dollars were spent on a demographic over the age of 35. we said looking at the world, the fact is that you have a far better opportunity of planting the seeds with a younger demographic which is what i was so supportive of the program. he said it is so it difficult when you wreach those. when you're younger you have an ability to do that. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan she will be able to change the perception of the united states in a way that we never could. it is the wisest testament not just for the future but for whitright now. >> we have a clash of technology in future. it is going to play out. she came across this egypt influenced network. if you google it, it is this blob of blue, red, purple circles. to the blue are people tweeted in english. the right people in arabic. the pu
in the environment or from whatever source, you're going to be, in my experience, not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do i"n exist, how do i deal with the problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues, and as we are welt aware, there's a lot of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge, and many in the room have been major contributors to that, and we've made great strides. it seems to me one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage advances in science and medicine to actually benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, solved, resolved by the advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us, and why i'm interested in being here, why we're participating in this, and there's still a lot of work to be done. now that you're allÑi here, noby leaves the room without signing a pledge without donating your time, effort to the clause; right? you wouldn't be here otherwise. let's talk a little bit or think
at this stage. there's a little bit of a risk on type environment at the moment. and the ten year bund yield moving a little higher. the same goes for spain, built oig and yield, as well. we were looking at the euro just bouncing a little bit against the dollar. you're heading into this morning's session, we're holding on to those gains, 127 and a bit. the dollar yen coming off by just a tad. president obama meeting with myanmar's president and opposition leader. obama saying his six hour stopover should be seen as a sign of support for myanmar's attempts at democratic reforms rather than endorsement of the country's government. meanwhile his three day trip is also aimed at reinforcing america's ties with the region. analysts say it's something china is watching very closely. deidre has more. >> the obama's administration to choose southeast asia as the president's first foreign trip since winning re-election was greeted by some with surprise. after all, there are far bigger economies in asia that warrant his attention. the strategic importance of southeast asia in the region is in full focu
at a normal interest rate, i'm a guy that wants to go 50/50 bond equities, are you saying in this environment i should be 75 equities, 25 bonds because of the risk? >> yeah, i think the problem is nobody is 50/50. today people are sitting at 80% this bonds. 10% quit tis and a little bit of cash. here's the big issue. americans need to retire. 75% of them have already said they don't have enough money. 40% said they'll never have enough money. so they're funding their lon term liability which is retirement 15 years, on average 58 years old, and they're funding it with a security that's at the end of its peak cycle. so usual getting zero rate of return and you're saying i'll fund the liability by an investment that i'm guaranteed to lose money in. the world is more complicated. it's not 50 stock and 50 bond. so you have to say i need to start to move into a more balanced portfolio. the big problem people have is they think it's a binary switch. i go from stocks to bonds. maybe risky people and speculate tors do that. but it means i need to start to lessen my bond position, because more balanced
remains cheap is by workers very little. but as you say there are environment externallalities as economists like to call it. the ways in which the food companies push out the environmental costs of what it is that they produce. they push out the healthcare costs, when we buy a dollar burger built into that dollar is not the long term healthcare cost of eating foods that is high in salt and fat but these are the ways that corporations manage to avoid the full costs. >> gavin: you talked about $200 hamburger. has there been actual work through the economics of a hamburger? >> yes the 200-dollar burger is an idea that came from a bunch of researchers in india. if this burger comes from a cow that was grazed on land that once upon a time was rain forest we can factor in the loss ecoservice and that's just the footprint. that does not include the low wages that are paid in the food industry or fields where even today we have workers who are living in conditions of modern day slavery. they're growing the tomatoes that end up in our burgers. the $200 hamburger is just $200 because of
know white house environment -- involvement was not an isolated incident. the energy and commerce committee of the house of representatives, e-mails specifically refer to joe biden and his staff advocating for solyndra, the solar panel company that received $528 million in loan guarantees before declaring bankruptcy in september of 2011. solyndra was rushed through in september of 2009 so that vice president joe biden could appear at the opening on september 4th. on august 31st, days before and, a communications aide to the vice president asked them to speed this up and there was pushed back from career staff at the office of management and budget. kevin carroll was chief of the office of management and budget energy staff, quote, i would prefer this announcement be postponed. this is the first loan guarantee and we should have a full review with all hands on deck to make sure we get it right. they didn't get it right and five hundred twenty-eight million taxpayer dollars were lost. it could be seen that the energy loan guarantees and a notoriously unsuccessful record. of the 33 e
of $15 a barrel oil by 2025. in terms of prices, we're talking about in the environment similar to today's, maybe slightly worse, in order to hit those and provide incentive to hit those will targets and also to dampen demand. that is part of the iaea calculus. you have both the production and demand side. an order for us to even in part a modest amount and get to that point requires a major steps forward in fuel efficiency. host: so who is benefiting the most? guest: the middle east continues to benefit tremendously. opec countries share a global connection forecast to go up -- production forecast to go up to nearly half of world oil supplies. the middle east remains a big beneficiary. the u.s. will be better off in those terms than it would be without this increase will bring production. we will be keeping more money at home. oil makes up about two-thirds of our trade deficit now. that number will decline. oil companies that do very well with higher prices will continue to do very well. host: back to the idea of shale gas. you mentioned some parts of the country where this is happening
're not directly getting at that. >> i think the carbon tax makes enormous sense to do with the environment impact of energy use. you can design one in a way that does not cause too much harm for american industries that compete with folks abroad. consumption tax, there are things you can do to treat the income tax to make it look more like a consumption tax. >> i want each of you to give me your thoughts at the end of the day, what do you think the tax code will look like with his conversations between the cop -- between the president speaker boehner are done? >> i think we will have slightly higher marginal tax rates on some high-income tax -- and these 1 high income tax payer. i think there will be a variety of tax exclusions and deductions that are scaled back modestly. >> if scaled-back means capped in some way, i agree completely. rex i think we will see some of those things will back. the top rate will be either 39.6 or 35. it will be somewhere in between. >> we have some common ground here among our economists. thank you, a gentleman for joining us. thank you all. i appreciate the peterson
. and in these kinds of environments where we see few details often those are the best deals. it's when everyone has confidence and equity markets are up and everyone is feeling great that they do stupid things. >> right. there you go. >> let's check in with bob pisani here on the floor with more of what's moving this morning. >> boy, did i hear dumb talk over the weekend about going over the fiscal cliff. i guess you were going to hear it. go ahead. let them go over the fiscal cliff. who cares. i heard this even from some people whose opinions i respect. well known economists and columnists. good heavens. did anybody look at what happened last time we were talking about this? the fiscal cliff is a wake-up call to politicians. august 2011, we were all here sitting on this floor when they couldn't agree on simple ability to raise the debt ceiling and they downgraded the debt. remember what happened? the s&p dropped 7% that week on the monday after it dropped another 7%. the vix went to 50 for a long time it stayed there. it ruined it the entire summer. almost the entire year of gains for virtually ev
such as protection of the environment as well as narrowing the gap between rich and poor. but as i said, these are very carefully worded. especially this year. no one wants to say something that is too aggressive or too reformist. because of course there is a pretty powerful group that are against pro market reforms. there are some that benefit, some leaders especially that benefit from the status quo like the officials of state owned enterprises which enjoy some advantages in the form of easier access to loan and less competition. >> if i could ask whether it really matters if the way that we read the tea leaves if it's the reformers or the conservatives here who have more influence in terms of this transition. what he he's the latest view one impact it will have? >> tons of speculation ahead of the roll out on thursday. it's likely going to be a mix of both some reformerses and some conservatives, but you're right in the sense it may not matter in the short term, but long term it will have an impact because some analysts say that the hu jintao administration on the way out did not do
practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. soothes you to sleep with ingredients like melatonin. it's safe with no side effects, so you wake up... ready to go. [ male announcer ] unisom natural nights. >>> despite the opposition's new coalition, syria's bloody civil war rages on, you can hear it there. as many as 48 people killed today. 41 in damascus area alone. the syrian government is also slamming the rebels' attempt to unite threatening any effort to topple president bashar al assad will be futile. >>> giving outsiders never before seen look into their country, they are expressing their pain and their hope through paintings. in the midst of a civil war that has taken lives of 35,000 people in 20 months. mohammed jamjoom report oorns o art of war. >> reporter: pain inspired these paintings. here's person who wants to kill another person, says this artist. and here's a person who wants to defend this person from being killed. conflict infuses these canvases, namely brutal civil war raging in his ho
diplomats on the ground. in north africa that is a changing area. there is a changing security environment. there are some broader issues. we need to see if they dig into those issues. >> we appreciate your joining us. form on friday on the so-called fiscal cliff. -- >> a forum on friday on the so-called fiscal cliff. we will bring that for you live at 8:15 a.m. eastern on c-span 2. >> the senate armed services committee heard from president obama's nominee to lead the war in afghanistan. he is currently the second highest ranking officer in the marine corps and will grow place region will replace john allen. -- the second highest ranking officer in the marine corps and will replace john allen. this is two and a half hours. >> good morning, everybody. to be the next commander of the international security assistance force. this morning's hearing was originally scheduled to include the nomination of john allen to be commander of the u.s.- european command and supreme allied commander. general allan holds the position for which general done for is nominated. the department of defense request
problems would be to develop a proper base for the economy. other than the intimidating of its environment. i was a meeting this year with a group of people who describe themselves as reformers in russia. at these meetings i had said -- you want a democratic system? are you crazy? [laughter] >> another question about china -- is some level of corruption in chinese politicians inevitable? is there some level that is acceptable for the party? is the problem the [unintelligible] -- that he went above that threshold? >> i think it was primarily an attempt to achieve preeminent or eminent outside of the established patterns of progress being made within the party. because if he had succeeded, it would not change the whole structure of the party. there is no acceptable level of corruption. is some level of except -- corruption acceptable? it is not for an outsider to say. every indication is that there will be demonstrative evidence to curtail corruption. that is the big question. i think they will succeed, but it will be a rocky road. >> with the u.s. becoming increasingly self-reliant regardin
the regulated environment we had back pre-1980 where everything was forced to be in the ticket price. so i think what we've come to is a more natural economic order in terms of cafeteria style. you pick what you want. but i think the unbundling is pretty much done. you may see a few things going forward, but most of it has been done thus far. >> david, joining us very early? san francisco, guys, a day when the company says they'll tap the brakes a little bit on their growth but coming off a profitable third quarter and expecting a profitable fourth quarter. guys, back to you. >> phil, thank you. i was trying to figure out what in the world they could possibly still charge us for. >> they'll figure out a way. all the airlines will. >> wearing clothes? >> paying nor travel with a bunch of naked people. >> can i pay to make sure all the other peenassengers are clo? >> i've never flown virgin. >> i love it. >> you wake up a newborn again -- >> born again every single morning. >>> when we come back, a world of opportunity, why u.s. consumers could soon benefit from an improved pan thama can t will. i
successor. intel has had a challenging environment that only for intel, but for the tech world. melissa: thank you so much. lori: so long microsoft, hello apple. a survey of pc users on how they feel about microsoft versus apple products. overall, 60% plan to buy a new computer. of those, 42% plan to buy an apple product instead of a pc. only 9% of people said windows 8 is motivating them to get a new computer. microsoft's latest operating system. a survey conducted a day before windows 8 was released and since the launch microsoft has not released sales numbers on windows 8. those are devastating findings for microsoft. melissa: we switched over to a mack household. lori: on behind the scenes of the fiscal cliff talks. the latest time under my deal will get done and who is running the show. charlie gasparino joins us next. melissa: step back off the ledge, twinkies are expected to survive. the hostess brand in court today. the latest on that just ahead. >> 21 minutes past the hour, and lorne greene with your fox news minute. the bloodshed rages on along the israeli border as attempts t
. they matter a lot. they create a environment which we can make or not make money. it is tough for investors. there will be volatile days. the trick for investors to have enough liquidity in their portfolio that they don't have to trade on these volatile down days. they're ready to take some opportunities when, when they find some good earnings. tracy: like what? let's say this market falls further. you go in. you start buying. what are you buying? >> i think we're, we're buying companies with a following characterics. we're buying companies that have strong brands. that have technology that is hard to replicate and have access to growing markets. the tough part of being an investor, you find companies like that in a lot of sectors and find them with headquarters in a lot of different countries. you want to look for the characterics of companies, not the kind of thing --. tracy: like what? hospitals for instance? >> i can't name. i'm not here to name names. we know that hospitals are are run very efficiently will ben at this time from obamacare. that is, they're well-positioned for that. we
sorts of things. but also along with training them, you have to create an institution and environment were you see guys going to happen and it's not necessarily a career ender when it happened. but we are working on it and i think we've gotten better because it's absolutely essential that we do. briefly in the demographics, one of the things i noticed was about 70% are public diplomacy dollars were spent if you do it demographically on an over the age we flipped out because looking at the world and the way it is, the fact of the matter is you have a far better opportunity employment being a planting seeds of the younger demographic, paul said it is difficult when someone reaches 40, 50, 62 change their perception of their ideas. when they are younger you have an ability to do it. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan, 15 or 16 years old, she will be able to change the perception of the united states and her family and her community and away we never could. so it's a wise estimate, not just for the future, but frankly for right now. >> so with a clash of tech
the environment is bad for the environment, beavers form wetlands other species could move into. he's important. >> what else does he eat besides bananas? >> vegetation and he likes to eat tree bark. he has teeth on them that are so much enamel that are bright orange. these guys chop down trees and build dams with them. >> you don't want to get in front of an angry beaver. >> bring out the owl. >> let me put the baby alligator away. the last animal is another species that would have been -- >> what are they called? >> barn owl. these are a species native to europe. european colonists would have been used to seeing these guys. these animals can find prey in pitch darkness. >> you're kidding. >> tests have been done on these species, they've removed every iota of light. they are called barn owls, because they are one of the few species that can live in human structures and benefit from our building. >> is that okay on your hand, looks like he's breaking skin. >> this is the first time you haven't been pooped on or bleeding. the turkey did enough for everybody. thank you so much, dave. >> thank yo
the journal on what improvements we see by putting teenagers in this environment. it will be printed next year. what we're seeing is a 10-15% improvement on survival rates. we're not dealing with medicine, just environment. if you had a drug that will give you 10-15% improvement on your outcome, they would throw billions at you. >> you cannot really argue with that. it sounds like a great plan. was there someone specifically? how did you become interested in teenage cancer? how did you notice there was a gap in this? >> as i said earlier, i noticed basically because my doctor and his wife noticed. i just have one of those brains that seem to me straight line, sensible things to do. there is a huge problem in madison of the moment. costs are going through the roof. there are other things you can do to improve the care of the patient. the one role of medicine that is observation of pedicethe patien. basically from the beginning when it was posed to me as a problem. >> when it was announced you were speaking here we did get questions from the general public, and some came from young adult teenage
examines how the u.s. can be economically competitive in a global environment. >> later today british prime minister david cameron delivers his keynote address on policy at the lord mayor's banquet in london. the event is attended by members of the city's financial and diplomatic corps. you can see his remarks live at 3:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. and i'm proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that insures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly-elected congress starts work in january, but the current congress still has work to do through the end of the
the environment for investment. .. that is vanishing. i know people who believe it is very important energy and should not be and it is not, in this case, a political issue. in europe and in america, they're going to make this outlandish opacity. you know, the opaque nature of these deals is corruption. when you publish what you pay, then the civil societies in those regions get to hold their governments to account. that is one the best things you can do to stimulate business and investments. thank you. [applause] >> hello, this issue is really close to my heart. how do we develop a global citizen's perspective and incentivize people to prioritize life outside of the u.s.? >> this sounds good. >> there is an amazing website. they just put on a concert in central park and they played. we have neil young, the black keys, a lot of people think, what? they are really pushing this idea. it is a jump in human consciousness. and i think that going to that website, i recommend it. >> good evening, i am vivien. i want to thank you for speaking candidly about africa. i am excited to sure about my con
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into these environments which are very, very important places to be, and debate our core value, not just explained them, not just lecture, but actually debate our greatest strengths i think will be stronger. so that was one of the ways we really tried to do that. and also to take the benefit of the folks who were there in the field, give information as to who was the important audiences for the bbg. >> can i just clarify one thing? when i said more guidance from foreign policy leadership for the bbg, i certainly didn't mean that the bbg should forsake or distort or anyway jeopardize the journalistic values. very, very important. but for example, the bbg's, the board of governors decide where the assets are allocated. in other words, if the governors decide we're going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessi
environment and economic factors are making things somewhat difficult for our customers and that's why we're getting to those numbers. the stock had come in and it's going to again today. >> a lot of investors are thinking that this gigantic move and pull back appropriately to some average and was ready to blast off. look, you've got target nipping, you've got dollar tree reporting good numbers today. walmart had a great move. and now its great move i think has run its course. >> an amazing chart, if you go back to walmart stocks, the dip in the stock, it was the bryberry bottom for this quarter. i don't know if we're setting up for something better than anticipation but the head of u.s. walmart said november sales started ahead of plans. and they have got some extra sales thanks to lay away which has been a very popular program for retailers of late. >> we used to get monthly comps from all these retailers. >> those were the old days. >> i think the problem with wam mart, frankly is, the stock was acting as if it was going to put target numbers up. pets smart reported the best numbers of
to the attacks? what was our assessment, our united states assessment, of the environment and the conditions on the ground and had we in advance positioned the right resources to mitigate risk and to make sure that we could handle those known possibilities? >> all right. general marks, thank you very much. appreciate it. i want to go back to the attacks on israel and gaza. the u.n. security council now holding an emergency closed door session about the crisis. member nations called for this. maximum restraints so the situation does not deteriorate any further. the big fear is that the escalating violence could echo the 2008 war that led to israel's land invasion of gaza. the year-long war killed some 1,400 palestinians and israeli. fred joining us from jerusalem. fred, first of all, we saw the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu speaking earlier about the escalating violence, the tension here. here's what he said. >> no government would tolerate a situation where nearly one-fifth of its people live under a constant barrage of rockets and missile fire, and israel will not tolerate this
energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. at meineke i have options... like oil changes starting at $19.95. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> a string of murders in new york city all tied to the same weapon. the victims sharing many of the same characteristics. now, police are trying to determine whether it's coincidence or something much more sinister. our mary snow is joining us with the details. pa ri? >> well, joe, police are stopping short of calling this a serial killer but not ruling it out and gone to the fbi with help of a profiler to track a murderer who committed three murders within miles of each other. is the murder of another brooklyn store owner the work of a serial killer? that's because ballistic tests showed th
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. (child screaming underwater)... (underwater noises). trying to find a better job can be frustrating. so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum. so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. . >>> former cia director, david petraeus, on capitol hill today testifying about the deadly attack on the u.s. kons late had in benghazi libya. partisan differences remain over the obama's administration's characterization specially their remarks by ambassador to the united nations susan rice. >> it goes to show that when you try to get information out very quickly, and because of congress wanting to hear about it, the administration, and media, that information with respect to intelligence evolves and changes, and when they received addit
-- >> environment, economy, on and on and on. >> environmental region. >> thanks, christy. >> you're welcome. >>> wait until you hear what mitt romney is saying now, that is coulding up. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are, or may become pregnant or are breast feeding should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possi
in this consolidated apple like checkout, iphone, anyone can check you out, it's efficient, nice environment. it's the apple store customer interface combined with the best brands of the world in a small geography. we had $250 a square foot in sales with the traffic down 12%. >> for your sake and for ron johnson's sake i hope this works and i love a great come back story. >> i want to leave our viewers with one thing. the biggest problem people have with something like this, how can i own a stock when the sales are down 26%? i'll make one analogy and help people think about how to value this company. we took a stake in wendy's, why did people not like wendy's? i get a chance we come back after a commercial, i'm happy to stay. >> i think we're going. >> give me one minute and i'm happy to come back another time. wendy's, people hated the management, there was a fast growing company called tim horton's inside wendys. we separated and the stock doubled. we have this fast growing retail inside jcpenney, profitable and high margins and the rest of jcpenney is shrinking. it's hard to look at it on a c
that trade the bank stocks right now say low interest rate environment and no growth or low growth environmentment in 2013. reason they are not particularly optimistic. today these stocks are bouncing back. carl, they have been beaten up badly in the last couple of months. >> thanks, bob. bob pisani. send it back to head quarters and kayla. she has the market flash. >> watching diamond food. the stock tlaubled for the last year a half. down another 11% today on a downgrade from jefferies. jefferies saying there is a -- 33% more downside for this company to go. last week it restated earnings for the last two years. wipe out about $56 million in profit. they had problem was their accounting and with the payme payments. >> meantime, tensions rising in the middle east. senior official close to binyamin netanyahu is ready for ground invasion in the gaza strip but prefers diplomatic solution to that conflict. >> reporter: hello there. in fact, it is nighttime in g . gaza. the attention is shifting south of where we are. focusing more on cairo, egypt. that's where intense negotiations ar
it, is the things we are doing to the environment, making these things more unbearable. construction, an earthquake there was one in chile that killed less than a hundred people, fewer than a hundred people. all of these things, and people have been forced to leave the countryside, to come to the city. so we often also discussed these things and how devotion in the land -- how it causes us to have these massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goes through. these things, they are more of the things that we can do something about as a community. but these other theories, they are also talked about. >> host: in reading through your book, "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know", i was struck that so many writers return to haiti. >> guest: i think so many of us come as children. we were a lot like our parents. arkansas like they had no choice to leave. so you do have this yearning for your country. and i have a lot of family that i did quite a lot. but there is this yearning, things that are parents described as a paradise and things to f
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)